October 6th, 2015

It is the hour.

It’s October 6th, which means An Inheritance of Ashes officially hits shelves today.

Things I came home to today. So I guess that's a win.

A photo posted by Leah Bobet (@leahbobet) on

This has been a pretty long road between the first drops of an idea and the book loosing into the world, and one that a lot of people carried and/or dragged me along when my proverbial legs got wobbly. So while I know most people preview a book with the first chapter? I’d like to show you my acknowledgments.

Here are the people I owe Ashes to.

An Inheritance of Ashes was a book that asked a lot of me. I wrote my first book as a writer, but I wrote this one as a person, and bringing your whole self to a book when you are a person, with so much more than books to love, is a harder set of compromises. A lot of people supported and carried me during writing Above; for An Inheritance of Ashes, a great many people offered, in the face of those more complicated things, so much that made such a difference: kindness, experience, and patience.

For all the work, thought, and encouragement that went into fostering this idea, even though the external things didn’t work out: Cheryl Klein.

For their patience with a very drafty first draft, and their comments on it: Michael Matheson and Ian Keeling.

Lindsey Shorser and Jeff Yagar, who put up with my occasionally collaring them to go: “Is this cool or stupid?” and reciting random plot points at high speed.

Kelly Jones, Pam McNew, and Jennifer Adam, for taking the time to not only talk about the writing, but to point out some of the things this particular city girl assumed or misunderstood about running a small farm.

Emma Bull, whose wisdom on other projects came forward to vastly improve this one; Merrie Haskell, who generously shared both her insights and experience, and made the way there much, much clearer; and Michelle Sagara West, for her invaluable knowledge and invaluable practicality, and willingness to share both.

Chandra Rooney, for probably a million hours’ worth of work dates all over the west end, talking out plot points, talking about positioning, beta-reading chapters that just changed completely anyway, double-checking my instincts on cover copy when it was midnight and my brain stopped working, making me write words instead of bailing to see Batman even though I really wanted to bail and see Batman, and finally, telling me it was going to be okay in a way she knew I’d believe. Which is what the best writing partners do, and the best friends.

The Ontario Arts Council, whose Writers’ Works in Progress grant program let me jump face-first into the scary, wonderful life of a full-time writer. Thanks for believing in this book at its very beginnings, and for the chance to, well, take a chance.

My literary agent, Caitlin Blasdell, for knowing exactly where to take a weird little book; Diane Kerner at Scholastic Canada for the immediate and ongoing faith throughout the life of this project; and Anne Hoppe at Clarion, whose patience and enthusiasm were the bedrock that made this manuscript happen—a bedrock that not excessively dented by teaching one anxious and occasionally very opinionated author the ins and outs of writing on proposal (and a few things about prose clarity and structural tics, besides). Thank you for the immense effort and care put into this book. It has meant everything.

And finally, Philippe McNally, who understands. In the acknowledgments for Above I said that now I understood all those acknowledgment-page stereotypes; what Ashes taught me is how a partner who wants you to make good art makes everything suddenly possible.

Thank you, love, for doing more than your equal share of a lot of things while I rewrote whole chapters; for the infinite supply of gross deadline snacks; for drawing both the Nopetopus and the capybaras with machine guns, which clearly contributed to my process; for making it clear that time I take away from Us Things for Book Things is not, in your eyes, a favour you do me or a debt to collect; and for, knowing full well that this is going to happen every book, marrying me anyway. I love you like a whole forest of adorable kittens where there is also an astronaut convention taking place. I love you like the sky. Thank you.

I sincerely hope you all enjoy it.

October 1st, 2015

YA Scavenger Hunt!

Ohhhhh yeah. It’s Scavenger Hunt time.

I’m Leah Bobet, author of An Inheritance of Ashes and Above, and I’m your host for this stop of the YA Scavenger Hunt!

The Puzzle

I’ve hidden my favorite number somewhere in the post below. If you collect the favorite numbers of all the authors on the blue team, and then add them up, you can hit the entry form at the YASH official site to qualify for the grand prize. Only entries that have the correct number will qualify.


The Rules

The contest is open internationally, but anyone below the age of 18 should have a parent or guardian’s permission to enter. To be eligible for the grand prize, you must submit the completed entry form by October 4th, at noon Pacific Time. Entries sent without the correct number or without contact information will not be considered.

Now that that’s clear, on to the content: It’s my pleasure to host author Jessica Khoury!

Jessica wrote her first book at age 4, a fan fic sequel to Syd Hoff’s Danny and the Dinosaur, which she scribbled on notebook paper, stapled together, and placed on the bookshelf of her preschool classroom. Since that day, she’s dreamed of being an author. When not writing, Jess enjoys spending time with family, playing video games, and traveling the world in search of stories and inspiration. Jess currently lives in Greenville, South Carolina. She is the author of Origin, Vitro, Kalahari, and the brand-new novel The Forbidden Wish.

When Aladdin discovers Zahra’s jinni lamp, Zahra is thrust back into a world she hasn’t seen in hundreds of years — a world where magic is forbidden and Zahra’s very existence is illegal. She must disguise herself to stay alive, using ancient shape-shifting magic, until her new master has selected his three wishes.

But when the King of the Jinn offers Zahra a chance to be free of her lamp forever, she seizes the opportunity—only to discover she is falling in love with Aladdin. When saving herself means betraying him, Zahra must decide once and for all: is winning her freedom worth losing her heart?

There’s more on The Forbidden Wish at Jessica’s website, or checking the book out here!

But for now, Jessica’s shared a sneak preview of the first chapter of The Forbidden Wish.

THE FORBIDDEN WISH by Jessica Khoury

Sounds pretty sweet — like the kind of book you’d want to reread 18 times!

I’m running my own giveaway here:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

But!  Don’t forget to enter the contest for a chance to win a ton of signed books by me, Jessica, and more!

Keep On Hunting

Thanks for stopping by! Your next stop on the hunt is Joshua David Bellin — give him some love, and happy hunting!

September 25th, 2015

Coming Soon: The YA Scavenger Hunt!

Among the swirl of release week: I’ll be participating in this Fall’s YA Scavenger Hunt!

I’m a member of the Blue Team, alongside a whole stack of experienced YA authors — and a pile of debuts!


The Scavenger Hunt runs from noon, Pacific time, on October 1st to noon Pacific on October 4th, complete with a huge amount of bonus material, prizes, and more. Join in by checking out the YASH How-To page — and sharpen your hunting fingers!

September 18th, 2015

Word on the Street!

I mentioned a busy fall event season a few days ago, and, well, I’m pleased to announce the first of them:

I’ll be reading from An Inheritance of Ashes, talking fantasy and science fiction, and signing books alongside excellent authors Megan Crewe and Natale Ghent at this year’s Word on the Street Festival!

Supernatural Sovereignty: Humans Defending the Earth

Nobody likes to be pushed around, but the assertions of dominance in these fantasy novels go beyond bully threats or pressure from parents. Join Megan Crewe, Leah Bobet, and Natale Ghent in conversation as they discuss the use of aliens, gods, monsters, and demons as larger-than-life villains in their novels.

To say I’m happy about this is kind of an understatement. Word on the Street has been one of my favourite lit events for years (I may have renamed it Personal Christmas) and getting to be a part of it is going to be frankly awesome.

The stuff goes down at Harbourfront Centre on Sunday, September 27, 2015 at 12:30 pm, on the This is Not the Shakespeare Stage, with signing afterwards.

Hope to see you there!

September 16th, 2015


An Inheritance of Ashes is out October 1st in Canada, October 6th in the US — and so it’s time for the fun bit.

The book launch.

If you’re in the Toronto area, please come on out to D-Beatstro at Bloor and Lansdowne celebrate as we launch AN INHERITANCE OF ASHES on Thursday, October 15th with music, delicious baked goods, reading, signing, raffle prizes, original art, and some special guests (announcements to come!).

The party starts at 7pm! Please come by and get a little too caffeinated, chat, and help launch this book at least above Earth orbit!

RSVP at the Facebook event — and RSVPs are important here, since there are drink tickets involved.


D-Beatstro is a community art space and cafe just east of Bloor and Lansdowne, dedicated to local music, art, social justice, workshops, and more! The venue is 100% accessible, has gender-neutral washrooms, and will be serving up Dark City coffee, tea, and delicious vegan-friendly snacks.

Hope to see you there!

If you’re outside of town and still like snacks and fun, fear not: I’ll be launching the book in Ottawa as well at CanCon the weekend of October 30th-November 1st (details to come!) and there’s a full slate of events for this fall. Most of which will probably include snacks and fun.

July 13th, 2015

Oh look, more fun:

Back from a wonderful Readercon (lobsters eaten, theory of fiction panels had, readings attended, friends seen) to some good news for the week after next!

I’m going to be an author guest at Blog Ontario’s Fourth Annual Book Blogger Meet Up, an informal mingle-style afternoon event for bloggers and readers that’ll be going down on Saturday, July 25th. The rest of the roster is pretty great: Sally Christie, K.A Tucker, Kevin Sands, Danielle Younge-Ullman, and Erin Bow.

As of this weekend there were about 18 tickets left, and you get snacks and a freebie bag with books and swag included in the ticket price.

Hope to see you there!

June 29th, 2015

Readercon Readercon Readercon–

Aaaand we have a schedule for this year’s Readercon, which is going to go down from July 9-12 in Burlington, MA. Behold!

Thursday, July 9

8:00 PM G All Literature is Regional. Susan Bigelow, Leah Bobet, Brett Cox, John Langan, Yves Meynard, Resa Nelson. Canadian author Alistair MacLeod once said, “All literature is regional.” How does regionality influence the worlds that speculative authors create, and the ways that readers approach those creations?

9:00 PM ENL How to Write for a Living When You Can’t Live Off Your Fiction. Leah Bobet, John Crowley, Michael Dirda, Barbara Krasnoff (leader). You’ve just been laid off from your staff job, you can’t live on the royalties from your fiction writing, and your significant other has taken a cut in pay. How do you pay the rent? Well, you can find freelance work writing articles, white papers, reviews, blogs, and other non-SFnal stuff. Despite today’s lean journalistic market, it’s still possible to make a living writing, editing, and/or publishing. Let’s talk about where and how you can sell yourself as a professional writer, whether blogging can be done for a living, and how else you can use your talent to keep the wolf from the door. Bring whatever ideas, sources, and contacts you have.

Friday, July 10

2:00 PM F The Future of Speculative Magazines, Part 3. Scott Andrews (leader), John Benson, Leah Bobet, Neil Clarke, Ellen Datlow. At Readercon 20, there were two very well-attended panels that looked at the future of magazines: “The Future of Speculative Fiction Magazines, Part 1: Print Magazines,” and “Part 2: Online Magazines.” Six years later, we return to this issue to discover what worked, what didn’t, whether magazines are any better off, and what the near future might hold.

Saturday, July 11

1:30 PM EM Reading: Leah Bobet. Leah Bobet reads a selection from her upcoming novel AN INHERITANCE OF ASHES.

3:00 PM F Shifting the Realism Conversation. Leah Bobet, Michael Cisco, John Crowley, John Langan, Yves Meynard. In a 2014 interview, James Patterson, not generally thought of as a fabulist, declared, “I don’t do realism. Sometimes people will mention that something I’ve written doesn’t seem realistic and I always picture them looking at a Chagall and thinking the same thing.” Meanwhile, the SF/F world is engaged in ongoing discussions about the value and meaning of realism in epic fantasy, particularly the variety that uses claims of realism to justify portrayals of violence, bigotry, and misery in cod-medieval settings. What shifts in these discussions if we adopt Patterson’s framing, setting modernism and abstraction in opposition to realism? What would abstract, modernist, Chagall-like epic fantasy look like? And would it work, or is some adherence to the real necessary in stories that explore the unreal?

Sunday, July 12

1:00 PM CL Kaffeeklatsch. Leah Bobet, Diane Weinstein.

Anyways, I am very much looking forward to this. And: Do I see you there?

March 19th, 2015

Ad Astra convention schedule!

My final schedule for this year’s Ad Astra has fallen into my hands, and it is large and thorough and voila.

Friday, April 10

1:00 pm Writing Diversity Well

We need diverse books! (We do.) Diversity in both adult SFF—and genre YA—is a big conversation, and representing yourself, others, and your characters well deserves the extra attention.

Join author Leah Bobet for a two-hour workshop about resources, tools, processes to use—and the questions to ask yourself—to write diverse characters well, and what a diverse book means—and doesn’t mean—when it comes time to sell your work. This workshop is open to writers of any and all backgrounds, orientations, levels of physical ability or neurodiversity, or identifications. Come prepared for a respectful, open environment where we’ll learn from each other.

7:00 pm Deconstruction: What Happens When You Take Tropes Apart
Charlotte Ashley, Leah Bobet, Gail Z. Martin, KW Ramsey

Genre fiction thrives on tropes, from the stalwart hero, the damsel into distress, and all the way to the nefarious villain, but what happens when a show takes those tropes and turns them on their head. Join us as we discuss how and why to do this and examine when it’s done right and when it’s done wrong.

8:00 pm SF for a YA Audience
Leah Bobet, Charlene Challenger, E.K. Johnston, Jane Ann McLachlan

Young Adult novels are tricky things – Enders Games was about children and youth – but not for them. Fantasy has managed to get a solid grasp on what the readers want…But Sci-Fi doesn’t seem to be catching on. Why not?

Saturday, April 11

1:00 pm Reading: Leah Bobet and Max Turner
Leah Bobet, Max Turner

2:00 pm Signing Session (2 hours)
Ada Hoffmann, Adam Shaftoe, Anne Bishop, Charles de Lint, David Nickle, Ed Greenwood, Gemma Files, Julie Czerneda, Karen Dales, Kelley Armstrong, Leah Bobet, Marie Bilodeau, MaryAnn Harris, Max Turner, Nancy Kilpatrick, Rio Youers, Sephera Giron, Stephanie Bedwell-Grime, Suzanne Church, Timothy Carter

4:00 pm How to Sell SF to General Readers as Literature
Charlotte Ashley, Derek Kunsken, Erik Mohr, Leah Bobet

It is nearly impossible to get a non-genre reader to even look at a book – much less read it – unless HBO has kidnapped it for a mini-series. So how do you prove that SF/F is more than pulpy star-ships and elves with perfect hair?

8:00 pm Cutting Contracts and Shaking Hands: Business Basics of Writing
Gail Z. Martin, Gregory Wilson, Leah Bobet, Monica Pacheco

How do you do? Would you like to read my work? Please sign this deal…The world is a scary place – especially when you are just learning how to put your work out there. Here is some helpful advice from seasoned pros in all areas of Writing and Editing.

9:00 pm In Defence of the Evil Empire, Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Big Brother
Charlene Challenger, David Blackwood, Leah Bobet, Simon McNeil

A key component of many genre stories, from dystopias through to fantasy stories is the rebellion narrative. Of course, having a hero struggling against an unequal and oppressive power provides an easy source of conflict and gives the protagonist the chance to grow as they overcome a seemingly unbeatable foe. Or as they fail to do so. But rebellion stories in genre are frequently very one-dimensional; the empire in Star Wars is overtly evil. How can we write better and more nuanced rebel stories? And what authors are doing so right now?

Sunday, April 12

12:00 pm Interactive Fiction: No Coding required!
Alice Black, Charlotte Ashley, Leah Bobet, Matthew Johnson

Thanks to tools like Storium and Twine, the ability to make interactive stories is now available to everyone. Find out how to get started without having to write a single line of code.

That is a big schedule — and one I’m very much looking forward to! See you there!

March 9th, 2015


A lot of things have finalized as AN INHERITANCE OF ASHES trucks along to its publication date (last week of September in Canada! October 6 everywhere else!). So I’m really pleased this morning to be able to show you not just the front cover for AN INHERITANCE OF ASHES:

An inheritance of ashes.jpg

–but also the absolutely gorgeous full jacket:


Basically it is beautiful, that bird has no head, its headlessness is great, I have no idea how it caws, and I’m excited.

February 16th, 2015

Writing Diversity Well workshop at Ad Astra!

Dropping in quickly to highlight a new development at Ad Astra, the local convention, which it’s a privilege to be part of: Friday workshops!

This year’s programming team has arranged a double handful of attendance-capped workshops for the Friday of the con (April 10th), and they cover a whole lot of ground: How to design games, prop weaponry that rocks, mold making, costumers’ makeup, and of course, writing workshops. Michael Matheson, Julie Czerneda, Ed Greenwood, and I are doing a really comprehensive track of writing workshops through the day, covering everything from the business side to worldbuilding to good self-editing strategies. It’s a tiny professional development conference in a jar.

The workshop I’m running? Writing Diversity Well.

We need diverse books! (We do.) Diversity in both adult SFF—and genre YA—is a big conversation, and representing yourself, others, and your characters well deserves the extra attention.

Join author Leah Bobet for a two-hour workshop about resources, tools, processes to use—and the questions to ask yourself—to write diverse characters well, and what a diverse book means—and doesn’t mean—when it comes time to sell your work. This workshop is open to writers of any and all backgrounds, orientations, levels of physical ability or neurodiversity, or identifications. Come prepared for a respectful, open environment where we’ll learn from each other.

It’s running at 1pm on Friday, April 10th, at the Ad Astra hotel space, and there’s a fee discount for con attendees (or vice versa: there’s a discount on badges for workshop attendees). The workshop signups are available only in advance, so if there’s something you like there, enroll early and often.

Hope to see you there — and hoping this is the first year of something really great!

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Last Tweets

  • .: So Harrison Wells will never be good. He will always be bad. :( Me: He will always be BEST.,
  • I'll just creep back to writing my off-brand Flash fanfic about Evil William Gibson and his scotch and his giant man-sized fireplace. <3 <3,
  • I LOVE YOU EVIL WILLIAM GIBSON--no, this is how they caught me last time. No, show. I know you don't love me no mo'. ,
  • . just came upstairs to give us a recap and started with "Well, in the opener, Captain Canada Goose was there--",
  • Oh my.,


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